Fetal Tissue is Vital for Scientific & Medical Growth

“Fetal tissue is involved in research across a host of different diseases and conditions,” says Carrie Wolinetz, the NIH’s associate director for science policy.

The cells have long been used to make some vaccines. And these days scientists are also using the cells to try to cure AIDS, fight blindness, prevent miscarriages and birth defects, and to find new ways to treat diabetes, cancer, Parkinson’s disease and other disorders.” -See following article.

Seeing how fetal tissue is vital for scientists to work on drugs to treat any and Screen Shot 2015-08-22 at 10.00.12 AMeverything, from Alzheimer’s to Paralysis. Keeping this in mind, women are going to continue abortion, be it legally and safe, then fetal tissue should not be a topic we are still discussing. No matter what, abortions will not ever end. Women, like myself, if found pregnant with an unwanted pregnancy, we will continue doing it all the same.

If I had been asked to dedicate the fetal tissues from my abortion to research dedicated to research for health care; including prevention, controlling and/or curing, why in this world would I say no? I don’t understand the “moral” dilemma these people scream about, but there is nothing wrong with abortion; and there is nothing wrong with giving / using aborted tissue to better their understanding, so they may help those are haunted by an incurable (as of now) disease.

After the twisted anti-abortion, anti-choice extremists created / deceptively edited a video to try and shut down funding for Planned Parenthood. In their fake videos they show us things such as an “abortion” only to be found out, it was a clear miscarriage procedure. Both the former and the following were analyzed by  many specialists and doctors; all finding the same thing any of us see; it’s fake. The other example is the photos of an “aborted” fetus were actually the photos from another miscarriage, photos they took from the family without asking consent to use, much less to use for lies.

Below is an excellent research paper regarding the importance of using fetal tissue for research as means to help understand and ultimately work towards a cure or a way to reduce pain. Doing this is advancement for society, treating women with respect and rightful privacy, in addition to helping countless people both now and in the future.

That is pretty damn moral and pro-life, both the abortion of an unwanted *to be* child and the use of fetal tissue to help us get to the days where no more people have to die or suffer. It would only be anti-life if they steal this away; actually it virtually is anti-life anyway because they are doing all they can to discredit and remove help and funding. Disgusting.

Article beings here -> original link follows the post.

abortion on demandLarry Goldstein is trying to find drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease. A biologist in cellular and molecular medicine at the University of California, San Diego, Goldstein also just started testing something he hopes will enable paralyzed people to walk again.

For both lines of research, he’s using cells from aborted fetuses.

“The fetal cells are vital at this time because, to our knowledge, they have the best properties for the kinds of experiments that we need to do,” Goldstein says.

Research involving fetal tissue has come under renewed public scrutiny recently because of a series of videos involving the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. The president of the organization, Cecile Richards, is slated to testify before a House committee Tuesday, even as some members of Congress try to cut off funding for Planned Parenthood, and some states try to restrict research involving fetal tissue.

Goldstein insists such research is invaluable. For his Alzheimer’s experiments, for example, he’s using cells from the brains of fetuses to look for drugs that could protect neurons from that devastating disease.

“To be honest, we don’t know all the things the fetal-derived cells do, but understanding what they do is an important part of the research,” he says.

Goldstein also just started transplanting fetal nerve cells into the spines of some people who are paralyzed, to try to repair their damaged spinal cords.

“We’re using fetal stem cells in a clinical trial to test whether they can help paralyzed people walk, as we’ve seen in rat versions of spinal cord injury,” he says.

Goldstein is far from alone in his reliance on fetal cells. The National Institutes of Health alone funds about $76 million in fetal cell research each year. This type of scientific study has gone on for decades.

“Fetal tissue is involved in research across a host of different diseases and conditions,” says Carrie Wolinetz, the NIH’s associate director for science policy.

The cells have long been used to make some vaccines. And these days scientists are also using the cells to try to cure AIDS, fight blindness, prevent miscarriages and birth defects, and to find new ways to treat diabetes, cancer, Parkinson’s disease and other disorders.

“Fetal tissue is used to study early brain development, which has great relevance to our understanding of the development of diseases such as autism and schizophrenia,” Wolinetz adds.

Fetal tissue is vitally useful, she says, because it’s unique in several ways. It grows fast, lives a long time and is incredibly versatile.

“It allows us to answer specific questions that can’t be answered by adult tissue, which is far more specialized,” Wolinetz explains. “Fetal tissue can contain information — about structural features, or the architecture of organs — that cells in a dish alone can’t provide. And this is sometimes very important to our understanding of disease.”

But critics question all that.

“It’s a bit antiquated in terms of its scientific use,” says David Prentice, vice president and research director at the Charlotte Lozier Institute, an organization that is opposed to abortion. He dismisses the idea that fetal tissue is scientifically indispensable.

(Here, we are introduced to the scientists who are mixing science and their views on abortion to taint the work they do. To read article in full, check the link after this article closes.)
“This practice of basically linking up science with the abortion industry corrupts what we do,” she says. “And, I would argue, it corrupts the science and the discovery that can take place.”

Other researchers dispute Schmainda’s assertion. Fetal cells remain crucial for many lines of research, they say, and the work can be done ethically.
Original post found HERE, as well as an option to LISTEN to the article.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: